A latte coffee fun facts

Since I’ve been talking a lot of coffee language lately I thought I would make a list of fun facts about coffee drinks and their ingredients. Confused when you read a menu at a coffee shop? Fear no more, Barista Lauren is here to clear things up. 

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Photo credit: Fastcodesign.com
  1. The difference between coffee and espresso
    • There is no specific coffee bean called espresso. Beans are turned into espresso shots with an espresso maker. The process that takes place within the espresso maker is a lot more complicated than the process that turns bean into coffee. That process simply consists of grinding beans, and pouring hot water over the grounds. In a future blog post, we’ll talk about all the different ways to brew coffee! 
  2. The difference between dark, blond, and medium roast
    • These three options all refer to how long the coffee bean was roasted and the temperature it was roasted at.
    • Blond roast has the most caffeine
  3. Single, dopio, triple, quad 
    • Looking for a quick way to wake up? Take 1, 2, 3, or 4 shots of straight up espresso.
  4. What the world are ristretto shots?
    • Ristretto = restricted in Italian
    • Here’s the Starbucks explanation: “Ristretto is made with the same Starbucks® Eastspresso Roast used for full espresso shots, but less hot water is pushed through the grounds. The result is a smaller, more concentrated serving with a sweeter, richer flavor.”
  5. Americano = espresso shots (normally 1 or 2) + water 
    • Cream is optional
  6. Latte vs. Cappuccino
    • Latte= espresso shots (normally 1,2 or 3) + milk + a little foam
    • Cappuccino = espresso shots (normally 1,2 or 3) + milk + a lot foam 
    • Difference-Between-Latte-and-Cappuccino.png
  7. The barista asked me if I wanted my cappuccino dry or wet…What does that mean?
    • A dry cappuccino has more foam than a normal one and a wet cappuccino has less foam than a normal one (essentially a latte)
  8. Mocha = mocha + espresso shots (normally 1,2 or 3) + milk 
    • Whip cream is optional
    • Can substitute white mocha
  9. Macchiatos = espresso shots poured through the milk
  10. Breve what?
    • Barista language for half and half
  11. Con panna 
    • Italian for espresso with whip cream! (one of my favorites)
  12. There’s a ton of confusion as to what a flat white actually is. 
    • I’m going to share my experiences with making flat whites at Starbucks because  I believe every barista has their own way of doing things, just with the same ingredients. 
    • I pour ristretto shots into the cup and then froth my whole milk. Here comes the tricky part: pouring. A flat white has a white dot in the middle on top of the foam. I start close to the cup, get as far away from it as possible without spilling the milk and then slowly get closer as the milk starts to fill up the cup. Then I pray that a white dot will magically appear. When there is, I celebrate because this is probably the closest I’m ever going to get to doing latte art. This video is a perfect representation of how I feel when my dot comes out perfectly! 
    • NF6zoQho-2400-2920.jpg
      Photo credit: Starbucks.com
  13. Black eye vs. Red eye
    • Black= brewed coffee + 2 espresso shots 
    • Red = brewed coffee + 1 espresso shot
  14. If you ask for a latte in Italy, you will get straight up milk.
    • I learned this one the hard way… You must add the word caffe before latte to get what you really want. 
  15. Do people ever mix espresso and tea?
    • The answer to that is called a dirty chai. 

Check back in a few weeks for fun facts about tea drinks. Now go show off your new coffee connoisseur expertise. 

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